Wednesday, 30 January 2013

Badger's House

Trudging home from work today with the rain stinging my face and wind battering me back, Badger's home in 'The Wind In The Willows' sprang into my head, a hidden, cosy home in the middle of the Wild Wood in Winter. Could anything be cosier than this irresistible scene?


From chapter 4, a bit I've always loved, in Badger's kitchen:

The floor was well-worn red brick, and on the wide hearth burnt a fire of logs, between two attractive chimney-corners tucked away in the wall, well out of any suspicion of draught. A couple of high-backed settles, facing each other on either side of the fire, gave further sitting accommodations for the sociably disposed. In the middle of the room stood a long table of plain boards placed on trestles, with benches down each side. At one end of it, where an arm-chair stood pushed back, were spread the remains of the Badger's plain but ample supper. Rows of spotless plates winked from the shelves of the dresser at the far end of the room, and from the rafters overhead hung hams, bundles of dried herbs, nets of onions, and baskets of eggs. It seemed a place where heroes could fitly feast after victory, where weary harvesters could line up in scores along the table and keep their Harvest Home with mirth and song, or where two or three friends of simple tastes could sit about as they pleased and eat and smoke and talk in comfort and contentment. The ruddy brick floor smiled up at the smoky ceiling; the oaken settles, shiny with long wear, exchanged cheerful glances with each other; plates on the dresser grinned at pots on the shelf, and the merry firelight flickered and played over everything without distinction.

The kindly Badger thrust them down on a settle to toast themselves at the fire, and bade them remove their wet coats and boots. Then he fetched them dressing-gowns and slippers, and himself bathed the Mole's shin with warm water and mended the cut with sticking-plaster till the whole thing was just as good as new, if not better. In the embracing light and warmth, warm and dry at last, with weary legs propped up in front of them, and a suggestive clink of plates being arranged on the table behind, it seemed to the storm-driven animals, now in safe anchorage, that the cold and trackless Wild Wood just left outside was miles and miles away, and all that they had suffered in it a half- forgotten dream.

4 comments:

  1. Just wanted to say 'hello' and that I have loved 'Wind in the Willows' since I first read it as a child.. My sister recently bought an old copy of it for me, such a lovely surprise.. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, that's a lovely gift, the sort of thing that is full of memories as well as being special in it's own right.

      Delete
  2. Lovely! What a brilliant book it is! :-)
    Carly
    x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's one of my favorites, I remember my mum reading it to me until I was old enough to read it for myself again and again.

      Delete